Orange & Districts

Select Society

ABN: 41 653 352 171

ADFAS Orange and Districts provides for its members a yearly programme of illustrated, informative lectures on a wide variety of topics.  The lectures are offered by overseas and Australian lecturers, chosen for their communication skills and expert knowledge in their fields.

Contact: orange@adfas.org.au

Committee 2020

Chairperson:
Mrs Julie Linton
Ph: 0414 065 105

Vice Chairperson:
Mr David Bracey
Ph: 0428 063 906

Treasurer:
Mr Brian Fisher
Ph: 0408 644 636

 

Secretary:
Ms Wendy Sissian
Ph: 02 63628223

Membership Secretary:
Mrs Ellen Fisher
Ph: 0418 262 334

Programme for 2020

17 March 2020
UNDER THE OPEN SKY: NEWLYN AND LAMORNA ARTISTS 1880-1940

This lecture gives an overview of art in Cornwall from the late19th century to the start of the Second World War that was created in and around the remote villages of Newlyn and Lamorna in West Cornwall and the port of Falmouth.It begins with the Social Realism of artists such as Walter Langley and Frank Bramley who captured the harshness of life for families in the fishing community of Newlyn. This lecture then looks at the fame that artists such as Stanhope Forbes achieved both at home and abroad in the 1880s and 90s with his depictions of village life and his fascination with capturing low light levels. It also surveys the maritime art of Henry Scott Tuke and Charles Napier Hemy who were Catherine holds a degree in Fine Art from Canterbury College of Art, and a Masters from St Andrews. She was a curator of Falmouth Art Gallery from 1993 through to 2000. Exhibitions organised there included Women Artists in Cornwall 1880-1940 and S.J.Lamorna Birch: A Retrospective. She has been a freelance exhibition organiser, author and lecturer since then and has organised exhibitions on artists such as Thomas Cooper Gotch and Henry Scott Tuke.   She has lectured to the Friends of Penlee House Gallery, Friends of Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery and the Royal Institution of Cornwall.  Publications include Catching the Light: The Art and Life of Henry Scott Tuke 1858–1929 (2008).  Catherine now delivers courses in Cornwall on the history of Cornish Art and also runs Study Holidays with an itinerary of lectures, cultural visits, including museums and places of interest in Cornwall.based in Falmouth, 28 miles east of Newlyn.

CATHERINE WALLACE
Catherine holds a degree in Fine Art from Canterbury College of Art, and a Masters from St Andrews. She was a curator of Falmouth Art Gallery from 1993 through to 2000. Exhibitions organised there included Women Artists in Cornwall 1880-1940 and S.J.Lamorna Birch: A Retrospective. She has been a freelance exhibition organiser, author and lecturer since then and has organised exhibitions on artists such as Thomas Cooper Gotch and Henry Scott Tuke.   She has lectured to the Friends of Penlee House Gallery, Friends of Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery and the Royal Institution of Cornwall.  Publications include Catching the Light: The Art and Life of Henry Scott Tuke 1858–1929 (2008).  Catherine now delivers courses in Cornwall on the history of Cornish Art and also runs Study Holidays with an itinerary of lectures, cultural visits, including museums and places of interest in Cornwall.

28 April 2020
ORANGE REGIONAL GALLERY: HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE COLLECTION AND VISION FOR THE FUTURE.
 

Orange regional Gallery holds a remarkable collection of Modern and Contemporary Australian paintings and sculpture. Brad will explore a few key pieces in detail, including works by Ian Fairweather, Roland Wakelin, Hans Heysen, Emily Kngwarreye, Margaret Loy Pula snd Kevind Connor as well as recent acquisitions.

BRADLEY HAMMOND
Bradley is Director of Orange Regional Gallery and Orange Regional Museum, having previously been the Curator of the Gallery’s Arts and Health strategy. He has curated numerous exhibitions and written for exhibition catalogues and art magazines. His drawings, paintings and video pieces have been exhibited in Australia, Africa and Europe.

26 May 2020
PHRASES AND SAYINGS- THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE CITY OF LONDON

The English language is rich in idioms, phrases and sayings which are part of everyday speech yet seldom to we consider their original meanings. This is an exploration of historical etymology, often traceable to the City of London. Even if you have to ‘rob Peter to pay Paul’ and it’s ‘raining cats and dogs’ you’d be ‘barking mad’ to miss this lecture.

ALAN READ
Alan holds a master’s and first class honours degree in History of Art from Birkbeck College, London.  He is a gallery guide at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, National Portrait Gallery and for Frieze Masters and regularly lectures at the NPG, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Plymouth City Art Gallery and other galleries in the UK. He also works as a London Blue Badge Guide and a City of London Guide.

23 June 2020
THE ART OF THE JAPANESE GARDEN

Expanses of raked whit gravel, iconic trees – pines, maples, gingko – carefully twisted and pruned into dynamic and sometimes torturous shapes. The soothing drop of water onto stone. The autumn light shining through richly coloured leaves. When you deconstruct them, the elements of a Japanese garden seem so simple that they’re almost banal, yet their combined effect is undeniably engaging and soothing. In this talk, I investigate the historic roots of Japanese garden design that, like much of the country’s art tradition, developed in isolation from European influence and thus preserves something quintessentially “Japanese”.

KATHLEEN OLIVE

Kathleen’s PhD was a study of artisanal culture in Renaissance Florence, through the lens of a goldsmith’s commonplace book known as the Codex Rustici. She lived and studied in Italy for a number of years, and then taught Italian language, literature and history at the University of Sydney. Kathleen now works for Academy Travel, leading tours to Europe and, particularly Italy.

21 July 2020
MR SELFRIDGE REVISITED- THE HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT STORE

From the mid-19th century, British towns saw the rise of the new department stores.  From innovative design and technology to outlandish publicity stunts, this lecture looks at the emergence of the great department stores and the how they changed the face of the British High Street. It is a history of new technologies – moving staircases, plate glass windows and innovative interiors designed to entice consumers into the new retail palaces. For the first time, ready to wear clothing meant that a new wardrobe of garments might be acquired all from under one roof and it revolutionised the way we shopped forever.

KATE STRASDIN
Kate has worked with objects of dress and textiles in museums for almost twenty years in curatorial positions and is Assistant Curator at the Fashion and Textile Museum in Totnes, Devon.  Kate is also a Senior Lecturer at Falmouth University, teaching history and contextual studies to fashion and textile students and a Specialist Visiting Lecturer at the DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai.  Publications include ‘An Easy Day for a Lady’ (Costume, Journal of the Costume Society, 2008) and ‘Empire Dressing – the Design and Realisation of Queen Alexandra’s Coronation Gown’ (Journal of Design History, 2012).  Kate has written a book about Queen Alexandra’s wardrobe which was published by Bloomsbury in 2017.  She is also one of the youngest practitioners of the dying art of producing handmade Honiton lace.

25 August 2020
PACKING UP THE NATION

This is the gripping and sometimes hilarious story of how a band of heroic curators and eccentric custodians saved Britain’s national heritage during our Darkest Hour. As Hitler’s forces gathered on the other side of the Channel to threaten the UK, men and women from London’s national museums, galleries and archives forged extraordinary plans to evacuate their collections to safety. Utilising country houses from Buckinghamshire to Cumbria, tube tunnels, Welsh mines and Wiltshire quarries, a dedicated team of unlikely heroes packed up their greatest treasures in a race against time during the sweltering summer of 1939, dispatching them throughout the country on a series of secret wartime adventures, retold in this talk.

CAROLINE SHENTON
Dr Caroline Shenton is an archivist and historian. She was formerly Director of the Parliamentary Archives in London, and before that was a senior archivist at the National Archives. Her book The Day Parliament Burned Down won the Political Book of the Year Award in 2013 and Mary Beard called it ‘microhistory at its absolute best’. Its acclaimed sequel, Mr Barry’s War, about the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster, was a Book of the Year in 2016 for The Daily Telegraph and BBC History Magazine and was described by Lucy Worsley as ‘a real jewel, finely wrought and beautiful’.  Caroline was Political Writer in Residence at Gladstone’s Library in 2017, has appeared at the Cheltenham, Hay and Henley literary festivals and on BBC radio and TV.

22 September 2020
THE AGE OF JAZZ

Jazz is one of the twentieth century’s most important musical genres: a fascinating blend of rigorous structure, free-wheeling creativity, close-knit ensemble work and improvisation. Sandy Burnett’s lecture covers the early years of jazz from its very beginnings and the first ever recordings made just over a century ago through to the start of the Second World War. Drawing on his practical experience both as musicologist and gigging musician, Sandy is able to shed light on jazz from the inside. His illustrations range from early pre-impressions by Maurice Ravel and others and the very earliest jazz recordings through to classics by Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five and the Duke Ellington Orchestra, and the dawn of the Swing Era.

SANDY BURNETT
After studying music at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge and working as music director for the RSC, National Theatre and in London’s West End, Sandy Burnett spent a decade as one of the core team of music presenters on BBC Radio 3. He enjoys a varied career that embraces broadcasting, conducting, playing double bass and communicating his passion for music. He regularly leads cultural lecture holidays, is the author of the Idler Guide to Classical Music, and was appointed the Academy of Ancient Music’s Hogwood Fellow for the 2018-19 season.

27 October 2020
PEDER SEVERIN KROYER- A PAINTER OF NORTHERN LIGHT

Looking back at his work towards the end of his life, Peder Severin Kroyer recalled his work at Skagen, the Danish artists’ colony at the northernmost tip of Denmark, and expressed his particular love for that time “when the sun is going down, when the moon is rising over the sea, hanging there, crystal- clear, and the water, smooth as glass, reflects its light…..”Kroyer was referring to the ‘blue hour’ of the northern Scandinavian summer nights when sea and sky appear to merge into a single luminous whole. This lecture explores Kroyer’s life and work in Skagen, and evaluates the paintings that made him into one of Europe’s most celebrated artists by the end of the 19th century.

KATHY McLAUCHLAN
Kathy McLauchlan is a lecturer specialising in 19th-century art history, she is currently a course director at the Victoria & Albert Museum, organising courses and study days on the history of art and design.  She teaches at several institutions, including the Arts Society and Art Pursuits. She is a graduate of Oxford University and the Courtauld Institute, with a Ph.D. on French 19th-century painters in Rome.  She is available for both individual lectures and study days, and a range of lecture summaries is set out below. 

Venue and Time of Lectures

Our ADFAS Orange & Districts lectures are held at the Orange Regional Conservatorium 73a Hill Street Orange.

Time: 6pm for pre lecture drinks and finger food.
Lecture starts: 6.30pm
Visitors welcome: $25
Membership for 2020 $130

ADFAS Orange & Districts Inc is one of 38 similar societies in Australia and offers eight high quality lectures per year by internationally recognised experts in the visual arts, film and literature. Six of the lecturers are from the UK and two are Australians selected for their knowledge and experience in their field. Lecturers come from diverse backgrounds and specialise in sharing their interest in a relatively informal way.

Each lecture is preceded by members and guests gathering for informal drinks and finger food, then the lecture is presented in the Conservatorium auditorium with opportunity for questions following. No special knowledge is required- just a natural curiosity and an interest in the arts (and a sense of humour of course).

Guests are very welcome to attend lectures at $25 entry. We look forward to seeing you at our lectures to enjoy cultural and social opportunities with like mined friends.

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