Launceston

ADFAS Launceston welcomes you.

In 2023 Launceston ADFAS will deliver an exciting program of superbly illustrated lectures on a diverse range of topics within the arts and related disciplines, including:

  • 6 face-to-face Lectures from International Lecturers, and
  • 3 face-to-face lectures from Australian Lecturers

Our lecturers are chosen for their communication skills and expert knowledge in their fields. All lectures are beautifully illustrated and our speakers’ enthusiasm for their topics is infectious.

Our friendly members all have one thing in common – an interest in learning more about a wide diversity of the arts, ranging through fine arts, history, photography, literature and music.  ADFAS Launceston also has an active Young Arts program, and we explore and provide opportunities for young people in our local community to develop an interest in the Arts.

Lectures:

Venue:
Lectures are held at Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus, Launceston. Please click here for venue information.

Time:
Lectures are held on a Tuesday and begin at 6:15pm, followed by light refreshments.

Program
Find full details of the 2023 program here

Membership:
Annual membership – $140
Please click here to join or email: launceston@adfas.org.au

Guests welcome:
Visitors are welcome to attend 3 lectures per year. for a fee of $30.00 per lecture. Please email  launceston@adfas.org.au

Contact:
For all enquiries please email:  launceston@adfas.org.au
Postal Address: PO Box 445 Launceston TAS 7250
ABN: 16 630 263 813

Committee 2023
Chair: Margaret Archer
Secretary: Wendy Webster
Treasurer / Membership: Ursula Love

2023 PROGRAM

Tuesday 28 February 2023
THE ART OF JAPANESE PAINITING
Presented by Kathleen Olive
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

Expanses of raked white gravel. Iconic trees – pines, maples, gingko – carefully twisted and pruned into dynamic and sometimes torturous shapes. The soothing drip of water onto stone. The autumn light shining through richly coloured leaves. When deconstructed, the elements of a Japanese garden seem so simple, almost banal, yet their combined effect is undeniably engaging and soothing. In this talk, I investigate the historic roots of Japanese garden design that, like much of the country’s art tradition, developed in isolation from European influence and thus preserves something quintessentially “Japanese”.

Kathleen’s PhD was a study of artisanal culture in Renaissance Florence, through the lens of a goldsmith’s commonplace book known as the Codex Rustici. She lived and studied in Italy for a number of years, and then taught Italian language, literature and history at the University of Sydney. Kathleen now works with Academy Travel, leading tours to Europe and, particularly, Italy.

Tuesday 28 March 2023
PERCUSSION: USE AND ABUSE
Presented by Nigel Bates
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

From calling ancient armies to battle to signalling the audience to stand for the National Anthem, drums and percussion have been a part of history well over and above their musical contributions. We explore how the design, sound and awareness of percussion instruments and the demands of modern composers have developed almost out of all recognition during the last hundred years. The lecture contains rare video footage from the orchestra pit at the Royal Opera House.

Nigel Bates is the Music Administrator of The Royal Ballet and has been a performer for nearly forty years in and out of the Royal Opera House (ROH), including seventeen years as Principal Percussionist with the Orchestra. He has worked with many of the leading figures in the classical music industry and was also a producer for both the BBC’s Maestro at the Opera and Pappano’s Classical Voices documentary series. He is a regular contributor to the printed and online content of the ROH. For over twenty years, Nigel has given lectures to arts societies and conservatoires in the UK and across Australia.

Tuesday 18 April 2023
DRACULA, DRAGONS AND OTTOMAN PRAYER RUGS: How oriental carpets came to decorate the walls of Lutheran churches in Transylvania, and why they’re still there today.
Presented by Dr Susan Scollay
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

Transylvania, the northernmost province of modern-day Romania, is home to the largest corpus of Turkish rugs and carpets outside the Islamic world. About 400 of these are preserved, and still used, on the walls of Lutheran churches high in the Carpathian Mountains – in the region made famous in the west by Brad Stoker’s infamous 1897 horror novel, ‘Dracula’. The church rugs include examples from the ‘golden period’ of Ottoman Turkish art spanning from mid-15th to mid- 18th centuries. Questions of how the rugs came to be in Transylvania and why they were used to decorate the churches are not yet fully answered, but recent scholarship has begun to provide answers.

Dr Susan Scollay is an Honorary Principal Fellow in Art History and Curatorship, School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.  Her work as an independent scholar on three continents has entailed, publications, curated exhibitions and substantial fieldwork in historic textiles.  Her expertise includes Islamic architecture and decorative objects, particularly those of the Ottoman empire and Persianate arts of the book, and the connections between these fields and parallels in early modern Europe.

Wednesday 19 April 2023
HALF INTEREST DAY – AN OTTOMAN ODYSSEY
Presented by Dr Susan Scollay & Dr Susan Aykut
Venue & Time: To be advised

An afternoon of lectures from two Susans who share their passion for all things Ottoman.

 

1. Branding the Empire – Dr Susan Scollay

This lecture traces the Ottoman arrival in Anatolia and their architectural imprint in their first capital in Bursa. It then charts the Ottoman expansion into the Balkans where Edirne became their next capital, site of the distinctive palace commenced by Murad II and completed by Mehmet II, even as he was setting out to establish Istanbul as the Ottomans third and last capital.

 

2. Cleaning the Empire – Dr Susan Aykut

A visit to the Turkish bath or hamam is on the itinerary of most present-day travellers to Turkey, as it once was for travellers in the past. It is a place that evokes all that is exotic and erotic about the East and it has excited Western interest for centuries. This lecture explores both the representation of the Turkish bath in the West, and its historical and social relevance in Ottoman Islamic culture.

Tuesday 30 May 2023
FROM CABINETS OF CURIOSITY TO THE UNIVERSAL MUSEUM
Presented by Dr Tom Flynn
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

This lecture looks back into the late 17th century to discover how the Cabinets of Curiosity assembled by the princely classes emerged as part of the Europe-wide intellectual revolution known as the ‘Enlightenment’. These extraordinary collections had a profound influence on art and culture, forming the foundations for the great museums of today, such as the British Museum, the Louvre, and many others. Many began as collections of collections, revealing the intellectual preoccupations of their rich, noble founders. To what extent were these collections enriched by the spoils of colonialism and imperial adventure during the nineteenth century?

Dr Tom Flynn is a UK-based art historian, writer, and art consultant. He holds a BA Honours degree (First Class) in Art History (University of Sussex), a Masters in Design History (Royal College of Art), and a doctorate from the University of Sussex. A former Henry Moore Foundation post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Sussex, he has written for numerous international art publications and is the author of The Body in Sculpture (Everyman Art Library, 1998). Interests: contemporary art; sculpture history; museology and history of museums; art crime; issues in cultural heritage; historical development and professional practice of the European art markets.

Tuesday 25 July 2023
THE POWER AND THE GLORY: HELENA RUBINSTEIN- COSMETICS, ART AND WEALTH
Presented by Lucrezia Walker
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

There are no ugly women, only lazy ones, quipped cosmetics entrepreneur Helena Rubinstein, whose company made her one of the world’s richest women. Businesswoman, art collector, and philanthropist, she was the first self-made female millionaire. She commissioned work from avant -garde artists such as Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dalí – who was to design a powder compact for her. Her exclusive beauty salons influenced and blurred the conceptual boundaries between fashion, art galleries, and the domestic interior. [Join us to discover more about this extraordinary woman, subject of recent exhibitions in New York, Vienna and Paris.]

Lucrezia Walker is a lecturer and gallery guide at the National Gallery in London. She liaises with the Gallery’s corporate sponsors and with the Tate Gallery and the Tate Modern. She teaches US undergraduates on their Study Abroad semesters in London and was Lay Canon for the Visual Arts at St Paul’s Cathedral 2010-2014.

Tuesday 29 August 2023
AN INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN SUB-SAHARAN TRADITIONAL ART
Presented by Nirvana Romell
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

In Africa, art has been used to replace a postal service, help with marriage problems and deal with unruly teenagers. Yet its seemingly exotic aesthetics is in many ways closer to Western art than one may assume. This easy-going introduction into African art focuses on general misconceptions, basic facts, influences of Africa on Europe and vice versa. It also provides guidance as to how to look at African art and to learn more.

Nirvana Romell holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in the History of Art and Masters of Arts in English Language and Literature. She has 20 years of lecturing experience on three continents. Since her arrival in the UK in 2003, Nirvana has been working as a freelance lecturer, public programmes consultant and tour director, organising and presenting tours of permanent and temporary exhibitions across the UK and Europe, and study tours to the Balkans, Italy, France, Switzerland, Sweden and South Africa. She has regularly presented art history courses and lectures as well as trained staff and volunteers at the Manchester Art Gallery, the Walker Gallery in Liverpool, University of Manchester and other art and learning institutions.

Tuesday 3 October 2023
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS REVISITED THROUGH ITS ILLUSTRATIONS
Presented by John Ericson
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

The beauty of Kenneth Grahame’s prose is widely acknowledged but the story is so full of wonderful imagery that it demands to be illustrated. First published in 1908 without illustration, the classic tale of Ratty, Mole, and the incorrigible Mr Toad has been in print ever since. What is less well known is that it has been illustrated by more than ninety artists – making it the most widely illustrated book in the English language. However, ‘Willows’ is a far more interesting book than its popular and often young audience might appreciate. It deserves recognition as a novel in which adult readers will find not just humour and entertainment but wisdom and meaning. In this engaging presentation we will revisit the story as depicted by numerous well known illustrators such as E H Shepard, Arthur Rackham, Robert Ingpen, Val Biro and Inga Moore and compare the same scene in the book through the eyes of different artists. We will explore how Kenneth Grahame came to write the story for his son Alastair, and the interesting but tragic life of the author.

Formerly Director of Studies in the School of Education and lecturer at the University of Bath, lecturer John Ericson had responsibility for the professional development of teachers. He has worked extensively overseas as an educational consultant and in this role has given lectures and presentations at conferences all over the world. In 2008 and 2011 John undertook extensive lecture tours in Australia and he has been a popular speaker for The Arts Society in the UK for many years. In his professional life, John has developed a particular interest in presentation skills, including the role of pictures in learning and the appropriate use of the PowerPoint program.

Wednesday 4 October 2023
HALF INTEREST DAY – ART INSPRIRED BY WINE
Presented by John Ericson
Time & Venue: To be advised

The drinking of wine and the collecting of antiques are, for many, among the most pleasurable of pursuits. As more people take an informed interest in wine, there has been a corresponding increase in enthusiasm for wine related accessories. As well as being functional, many of these items, such as drinking glasses, decanters, and cork.

Formerly Director of Studies in the School of Education and lecturer at the University of Bath, John Ericson had responsibility for the professional development of teachers. He has worked extensively overseas as an educational consultant and in this role has given lectures and presentations at conferences all over the world. In his professional life, John has developed a particular interest in presentation skills, including the role of pictures in learning and the appropriate use of the PowerPoint program.

Tuesday 31 October 2023
FROM BRONZES TO BANKSY: AN ARMCHAIR TOUR OF PUBLIC ART AND STREET ART
Presented by Ian Swankie
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

London not only has a world-class reputation for art in its many galleries, but also a remarkable range of art outside in the streets. We tour around the capital discovering some of the most interesting works from across the centuries. They range from huge and expensive commissions to unofficial graffiti, which is sometimes audacious and often playful, but they all have a place in our society. We look at why art is there, how it has developed over the years and discover many hidden gems.

Ian Swankie is a Londoner with a passion for art and architecture. He is an official guide at Tate Modern, Tate Britain, Guildhall Art Gallery and St Paul’s Cathedral and gives tours at each venue. He is also a qualified and active freelance London guide and leads regular tours for various corporations and organisations. Since 2012 he has led a popular weekly independent art lecture group in his hometown of Richmond in West London and he gives talks on a variety of subjects. He is an accredited lecturer for The Arts Society and a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Art Scholars, one of the City Livery Companies.

Tuesday 21 November 2023
IMAGES OF THE HEROIC AGE OF ANTARTIC EXPLORATION
Presented by John Williamson
Time & Venue: 6:15pm Sir Raymond Ferrall Lecture Theatre @ The University of Tasmania’s Newnham campus

This lecture discusses the art and photography of the Heroic Era of exploration in Antarctica, focusing mostly on the extraordinary work of Herbert Ponting, Edward Wilson and Frank Hurley.

John is currently the Coordinator of Humanities and Senior Teacher, Fahan School. Until 2019 John was also Associate Lecturer, Bachelor of Antarctic Studies Programme, IASOS, at the University of Tasmania. He has operated as a Historian/Guide, for the Quark Expeditions, “The Wonders of the Ross Sea” Antarctic Voyage and Researcher and Tour Guide, for “Hobart’s Waterways Tours”, Hobart City Council. John has also been an Antarctic History Researcher, ‘Antarctic Tasmania’, Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmanian Government. John has written numerous published articles on his areas of interest.

ADFAS LAUNCESTON YOUNG ARTS PROGRAM

The object of our Young Arts Program is to inspire young people with an enthusiasm for the Arts.  As well as direct donations from ADFAS members, we conduct raffles and organise special functions to raise money for this Program to provide financial support assisting young people, under 22 years of age, to experience a range of local artistic endeavours-music, painting, poetry, sculpture, singing, photography, and dance/movement.

ADFAS Young Arts does not run programs, it offers funding sponsorship for young people to have exposure to arts activities that would otherwise not be possible for them. Preference is given to projects benefiting a group rather than an individual, and to projects without the capacity to attract institutional funding.

ADFAS Young Arts has supported a variety of art projects and in 2019 Launceston ADFAS was the winner of The Pauline Hopkins Cup, awarded in recognition of the variety and achievements of its 2018 Program of Young Arts.
including:

While the COVID-19 pandemic has restricted our ability to sponsor projects over the last two years, we continued to sponsor the transport of children from different schools to attend the annual Glover art exhibition of landscape paintings of Tasmania, and participate in Singfest, a choral celebration involving primary students from schools in Northern Tasmania

We look forward to resuming an active Young Arts program in 2022.

For further details, contact the ADFAS Young Arts Coordinator: launceston@adfas.org.au